The fairy godmother project

For an unbaptised atheist, being asked to be a godmother was, well, rather a surprise.  But since the child’s parents were quite clear in their expectation that I should lead the child astray (in the nicest, most socially just and politically aware manner), I said yes.

The plan was for the deed to be done in November last year, along with his older brother, but the Catholic Church was a bit busy, what with Christmas approaching, so it got put off.  In the meantime, a  younger brother arrived, so it became a three-for-one deal.

Meanwhile, the christening gown I’d started making, got put away (tiny fiddly pieces cut from lovely silk satin that fairly haemorrhaged silver wisps).

Then the date was set, and the urgency resumed.  With much hand-sewing and very careful ironing, it gone done with a week to spare and posted to the child’s parents.  Except my godchild is nearly two and it didn’t fit.

But it did fit his younger brother.  Best of all, Young Ben didn’t even throw up on it!

Of course it’s not all about the godchild – the fairy godmother needed something sensational to wear.

Purple coating and the most sensational lining ever.  Which, it turned out, was absolutely necessary – the church was absolutely freezing.

And here I am with my Godchild, Will, wearing the fairy godmother jacket, which is the best garment I have ever made.  It fits perfectly, nothing went wrong during the construction and it’s absolutely unique.

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3 responses to “The fairy godmother project

  1. Yay! I saw the jacket last week and didn’t click at first that it was THE fairy godmother jacket. I thought you’d gone off buying stuff. Silly me, nothing bought would have been that perfect for you. It’s really gorgeous.

  2. Nice work, Elle! What sort of fabric was the coat made out of? Oh, and I LOVE LOVE LOVE the lining!

  3. I can thoroughly attest: this jacket looks absolutely smashing on you, Elle. Good fit, great colour, and yes, that OUTRAGEOUS lining. Well done!
    (now, how to make it easier to manage those darned slippery satins…)

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